Course Overview

American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics Course Overview

The civics component of this course analyzes the structure and functions of the federal, state, and local governments as established by the United States Constitution and the North Carolina state constitution.   It also examines civil liberties, landmark Supreme Court decisions, contemporary issues, and the ways in which citizens contribute to American democracy. The economics component of this course will analyze principles of macro- and microeconomics, and best practices in managing personal finances.   Students enrolled in an honors section complete more challenging and rigorous coursework. They are also required to demonstrate an increased level of independence, and participation in class discussions and activities.


AP U.S. Government & Politics Course Overview

AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States.  Students study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behavior.  They also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments.  In addition, they complete a political science research or applied civics project.  AP U.S. Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States.  Students study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behavior.  They also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments.  In addition, they complete a political science research or applied civics project.